September 24, 2006

Text 100 Misses the Second Life Boat

Nice clean world presented by Text100 in their video on how companies can do better brand building and build stronger customer relationships all while "marketing their products much more efficiently" (the old fashioned way, except as good looking avatars), on Second Life.


While PR ass kissing goes on about what a good idea the video was, I have to say, What?

What a waste of a high quality video effort. I've got it! Let's say we're going to demonstrate the power of virtual world interactions so that we can build islands for OUR clients right? And show them how they can invite their customers to do business with them the same way as before, except, it's fake, right, so let's replicate the meeting rooms, dress up in nice suits that only Kenny with the earrings can wear "that way" in our real office, and drag our clients into a virtual world meeting where they can stare at a virtual CEO at a virtual podium talking about the power of brand building and marketing in a virtual world with our virtual logo installed in the virtual background.



Nice production value, okay, but WHAT? I think I even saw a PowerPoint Pie Chart.

I don't know what Second Life you're in, but in MY Second Life I'm still building cubes out of wood, wondering what the hell THAT creature is, how I kiss it, all the while mistakenly getting on (and booted off of) other people's vehicles as I look for my realworld friends in their Second Life forms. A good night is sitting on a bench chatting up the virtually buff Michael O'CC about how cool it is that we can both smoke in second life as I struggle to figure out what keystrokes = INHALE DEEEEPLY.

You see, an Island doesn't a strategy make. And don't let them fool you, my friends on the other side of the isle. The REAL power is in human beings inhabiting worlds where they are not who they are, and who they are is not who they become, and what they do may -- just may be -- who they really are. Within those nuances of play and passion and aggression is where we connect.

For example, if you're a major maker of floor coverings, you'd do better to connect with your market as an EXPERIENCE inside of a virtual world -- not on your own island or your PR firm's island, or on a pixelated repeat of Madison Avenue or your showroom. NO. Get to the context of the thing. Meet me in a seedy virtual jazz club where I'm tapping my feet on your hardwoods (what sound does it make? can I hear it?), or snapping my whip on the easy-to-clean linoleum of a BDSM hideout (is it really tough on stains?), NOT standing in a virtual demo kitchen staring at a virtual floor with a virtual pattern made up as a Carol Brady avatar in a post-modern suit.

You get?

Tell me you get.

(Hat tip for the little jig at the end of the video. Next time strip or somethin'.)

Love,

Sandy


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , = Powered by Qumana

1 comments:

Hans Zinnemann said...

The important thing to learn from this is that marketing in Second Life is all about community.

If they wanted to catch a Second Life boat then perhaps they should have purchased one from Zinnemann.